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Did you know?
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

Mel Fischer

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Mel Fischer last won the day on September 18

Mel Fischer had the most liked content!

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About Mel Fischer

  • Rank
    Distinguished Member
  • Birthday 06/18/1941

Profile Information

  • My favorite Christmas story
    Do not have one
  • Location
    Mount Vernon, Washington, USA
  • Biography
    Retired
  • Interests
    Our main decorating interests are in blow molds and wireframes. At this time our display is 99% static and will probably remain so.
  • Occupation
    Retired
  • About my display
    No display

Recent Profile Visitors

4,757 profile views
  1. Mel Fischer

    Target

    The local Target here did not have the big ones either, we had to go to another Target store that we usually don't go to.
  2. Mel Fischer

    Bel Air Plastics blow mold candle

    That has been my thoughts on the lettering from the day I first saw them.
  3. Mel Fischer

    Bel Air Plastics blow mold candle

    We have newspaper ads from 1970 & 1971 with the Bel Air #172 candle in them. We have had a pair of those for many years now along with the Bel Air #700 Santa. Mel
  4. Mel Fischer

    Mold craft / heller carolers

    That would be very much appreciated. Mel
  5. Mel Fischer

    Mold craft / heller carolers

    I think that you will find that most people who might have information on that one are not necessarily willing to share it. None them will share it with me. Mel
  6. Mel Fischer

    Mold craft / heller carolers

    Here's a Mold-Craft picture postcard from the early 1950's showing the Wiken choir signers. The one in the top row left end was their #220-4 and was named "Sam". In the bottom row left end is #200-7 and was named "Ebony". Bottom row center is #200-9 "Topsy". Wiken designed and copyrighted these between 1951 and 1954. The second picture is the Heller Industries black choir singer, I do not know anything about that one other then it had to have been made sometime between 1962 and 1965. The molds for all of these choir singers were destroyed in a fire in 1966. Mel
  7. Mel Fischer

    Mold craft / heller carolers

    What kind of information are you looking for?
  8. Mel Fischer

    Amloid candy pails

    Was at Walmart yesterday and got the nutcracker and they had the Amloid teal color pails out so I got two of those. Mel
  9. Mel Fischer

    Amloid candy pails

    What we have found so far in the Amloid candy pails. The pails in the first picture all came from Walmart, the pails in the second picture have the Kmart and Walgreens pails in the stack on the right with the top two from Kmart and the bottom two from Walgreens. Mel This is an Amloid pail that we got last year before they bought the General Foam pail molds. Mel
  10. Mel Fischer

    A few Halloween blow molds

    Ted, nice to hear that you have good intentions with the bag making but you might find the longer you wait to start the more difficult it will be to get started due to adding more blow molds and having that much more to do. I speak from experience there. I have been making bags again the past couple of weeks and made 16 more bags yesterday afternoon, it is a never ending project because of more blow molds coming in almost every week and then I have gotten 16 different Amloid candy pails the four new Target pails and two American Maid pails that all needed bags. Fortunately all the candy pails now have their bags along with several of the blow molds that are in the picture of our front porch.. Mel
  11. Mel Fischer

    A few Halloween blow molds

    Scott, I would love to have been able to go to the GF factory but living north of Seattle, WA it was an impossible dream, it would have been a bit more then a 12 hour drive for me. I would have grabbed all the plastic bags I could get my hands on but then I have had enough years at making the bags that I would have thought about how much time it would have saved me. Mel
  12. Mel Fischer

    A few Halloween blow molds

    Hi Scott, I make most of my own bags to fit the different blow molds. I get free plastic from the dumpsters at a furniture store and a mattress store in town, I have permission from both stores to take the bags and plastic that they throw out. I cut the plastic for the blow molds and use a bag sealer to seal the edges. Until a few months ago I used an old food sealer for making the bags a foot at a time and just moved the plastic until the side was sealed, I have made bags that are 5 & 6 foot long and also bags small enough to hold a flashlight or small table top mold with that method. The problem with that method through the years was that it basically takes two people to make the bigger bags, one to hold the plastic and one to do the sealing and my wife helped me with that. A few months ago I bought a plastic sealer that has a foot pedal for doing the sealing and now I can make any size bag by myself. It is still the same method except I do not need anyone to help me. A couple of nights ago I made seven bags for some spook sticks and small blow molds without any help and it went faster then when I needed the help. If you search eBay there might be some a few dollars cheaper. https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-110V-12-Foot-Pedal-Impulse-Sealer-Heat-Seal-Machine-Plastic-Bag-Sealing-US-/401488401210?hash=item5d7a92d33a Mel
  13. Mel Fischer

    A few Halloween blow molds

    That depends on a persons definition of a blow mold. For true holiday blow molds it would have to be some for the Beco ones from 1962 as I have not found any confirmed information on any other company making them in 1962. It is possible that someone else did make some blow molds in 1962 and before but I have not been able to find any actual proof of that. If anyone else has proof of another company producing some earlier then 1962 it would be great to have them share the information. Mel
  14. Mel Fischer

    A few Halloween blow molds

    Hi Scott, Please forgive the delay in replying to your questions, I just plain forgot to do it when you asked and I found your post again today. I do bag the blow molds to keep the dust and dirt off of them along with it helping some to keep from scratching paint off while moving them around in storage. When we were doing a display we always cleaned the blow molds good when we took the display down after the holidays and then bagged them up for their protection. As for you bagging them, that is for you to decide on what kind of condition you want to keep yours in. Today my wife and I are in our 70's and 80's and along with health conditions the big display got to be too much work for us to set up and as most who do a display know, taking it down and storing it until the next season is more work then the setting it up so we no longer do a display. My real interest in the blow molds today is the research and history on what was made, by who and when they were made and sharing some of the information when I think it might be of interest to others. When we were doing a display we usually had around 100 blow molds in the display as we do not really care for the overcrowded look of many of the displays we have seen in the past. We tried to set the display up somewhat in scenes. We decorated the area to our tastes and what we liked to look at we did not concern ourselves as much with trying to put up a flashy display and try to attract large crowds to see it but we did hope that those who saw it would enjoy it also. I do need to say though that we live in the country and are surrounded by big trees and it is difficult to see much of the display from the road. We always loved the displays we did ourselves and almost every night if the weather permitted I would go out about 15 minutes before the lights went out and just walk around looking at the display and enjoying it. We always tried to have the first lights on Thanksgiving night and the last night for the lights on was New Years night. Here are a few pictures from 2010. Mel
  15. Mel Fischer

    Amloid candy pails

    Walmart finally got some of their Halloween items out and they had a few of the Amloid candy pails made from the GF molds. They had nothing of interest to me at all otherwise. The orange pail in the first picture came from Walgreens, the other five came from Walmart and were the only selection that they had. The two in the second picture came from Kmart. All of the pails were made in Mexico, Amloid has a factory there. Mel
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