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  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.

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  1. 13 points
  2. 12 points
    So today I went to an auction where I heard there was some Christmas stuff. Well they were right and this was just in one of the rooms also found several commercial wireframes. Turns out the person that owned this had bought out a couple of large displays. so this room I had 144 channels of LOR and Ramsey's transmitter stuck in the corner. The auctioneer decided it would go as a set which turned everyone else off.......so I got it all including another room of frames.
  3. 11 points
    I know that by Planet Christmas standards, I am a rank amateur. Still, I won an award from the Colonialtown Neighborhood Association for best decorated house in the Norman Rockwell (nostalgic) division. So I put a few pictures on Planet Christmas because I have enjoyed your company so much during the other months of the year. Aside from what can be seen in the photos, I have a star shower trained upward into a 300 year old live oak; blooming camellias and hibiscus, and, over 250 poinsettia blossoms throughout the property. Thanks for the thoughts you folks shared with me in 2016 and a very fine 2017 to you all! Doc
  4. 11 points
    https://youtu.be/cOSioQunihM
  5. 10 points
    Here is my 2016 display. I had a little more to do but got the call that I had to leave to go out of town for work so I wasn't able to finish. This was my first year to attempt a mega tree. Hopefully it will make it all season because I threw it together last minute. It's about 12 ft with the star. Next year I want to make a bigger one. I also had a lot more blue lights to put on my tree to the right of our carport. I think the wife is going to get out there and do it one day this week. She stays busy with 3 girls under the age of 5. Also I hade a few lights go out on my candy cane tree but I had to choose between fixing them or putting more stuff out before having to leave. Overall I pleased with how it turned out this year. I'm not a huge fan of multi color lights but that's what my wife wants so that's what we got. Hopefully in the next couple of years I will be able to get the retro fit bulbs and do a candy cane theme.
  6. 10 points
    After checking online everyday for a few years I finally got "the one". Just as I was giving up hope it appeared! It is a Dapol blow mold from 1973 and in really great shape. I feel like my collection is complete......my hubby just shakes his head when I say this..lol.
  7. 9 points
    I apologize in advance for the quality (or lack thereof) of the photos My yard is a paradigm...it's a big front and side yard so there's plenty of room for decor but the yard slopes sharply from the street so i have to get creative in displaying things (like building elevated platforms). Here's the front yard which goes for a vintage theme
  8. 9 points
    A mother thanked me for all my hard work and then went on and on about me taking the time to dress up as Santa night after night and stand in the window......Virtual Santa..
  9. 9 points
    Well... I've finally finished my new characters for this year's display. I decided to go with the characters from Frozen and this is what I came up with. My 11 year old daughter painted Anna all by herself (other than the shading). She's told me that she wants to have her own Christmas display when she grows up... so I'm teaching her the process. AAaaahhh... it does an old man's heart good to pass along the traditions just as my father passed them along to me! ... and one more to give you an idea of the size of the characters. (FYI... the tree is 7' 9" tall)
  10. 9 points
    Picture from our local historical society of a house in the community decorated for Christmas in the 50's.
  11. 9 points
    Went live tonight. Finished my Poloron Mechanical Santa tonight lol, talk about cutting it close. I'm pretty happy with them. They are not anywhere near perfect, but they are a million times better than what they were before.
  12. 9 points
    Here is my display so far..... Still have to put out the Mechanical Snowman and Santa. Video.MOV
  13. 9 points
    I also took the battery unit out and (in my case) lit them with CFL bulbs. Then I 'strung' them on a garland with mini twinkling LED lights, added some gold ornaments then put it across (and tied everything securely to) the bench. The oversized bulbs fit right in with the other large decorations I displayed last Christmas season.
  14. 8 points
    We are making 4 of these trees. Using 3/4" pvc. Over half was a garbage find lolol. I know I know, generic, but starting out with simple and keeping simple. About 1350 lights used. Adding LED next year , a little at a time. These are super easy to make and store. Very solid. Thanks for looking
  15. 8 points
    I'm 19 and have been doing this for about 10 years so far, I've came a long way with my display in just the past few years even. Here are some highlight pics of this year and a link to the website and Facebook page: http://eurekamochristmaslights.weebly.com/ https://www.facebook.com/ForestRunLights/ I'm open to any suggestions-good or bad for next year, thanks for looking!
  16. 8 points
    I know there was a thread about why was it always about the amount of lights but that's what people like to see and hear. How many lights we have and what we do with it. The snowmen and Charlie Brown Christmas tree are made out of rope light and the Nutcracker is a metal frame with LED ribbon light. Not the best to use when we have rain and freezing temperature. Will have to modify it for next time we set the display.
  17. 8 points
    Here are some pics, I will post up more later. Hope everyone likes it, open for any comments and suggestions.
  18. 8 points
    Well my birthday was good today I'm 18 now wow , I can't tell you how happy I am to have such a good start to my collection many years to come ha thank you everyone on here you are all so nice thanks for that
  19. 8 points
    Can you guys help with the history and years and maker thank you these are apart of my display now , I rewired a few today hopefully the rest tommorow
  20. 8 points
    Finally found one and at an over priced antique store however this was $36...
  21. 8 points
    These are my favorites I'm a bit of a Poloron Caroler hoarder!
  22. 8 points
  23. 7 points
    We are getting some early snow here in NYC. I took a few shots of my blow molds in the snow. Nothing fancy, I'm a poor photographer, just a few photos taken with my flipphone.
  24. 7 points
    Hey PC family! I've been out of the PlanetChristmas loop for awhile. I occasionally monitor a few Christmas related sites and FB pages, but my job and family life has kept me too busy to stay connected with anyone. Those that have been a part of PC for many years like myself, know that I'm known for my ferris wheel and skating rink. I'm not saying mine are the best, there are many people here that have great ferris wheels and skating rinks. I've posted pictures, videos, and how-to's over the years. Yet I still get emails and my inbox is full of messages from people asking for help with one or the other. I am more than happy to help, but like I said, I've been out of touch and don't get on PC too often. I've transitioned into a RGB display for myself, and I've been trying to learn as much as I can in that world. But what I've learned in this process is that I, and many others, still miss the magic that a mechanical display can offer! My mechanical elements have all been sold off or torn down due to age and damage. However, I plan to bring back my ferris wheel. New, improved, and I intend to capture images along the way! Not for recognition. Not for any other reason than to hopefully have 1 more and possibly last necessary avenue for those interested in building a pvc ferris wheel. This will be easier for me than to try and respond to each and every request. It will also be cleaner having step by step pictures along the way. So be on the lookout in the next few months as I start the build. Probably early spring! As for the question of why a pvc ferris wheel....it just better fits my need. I started out with a wooden ferris wheel. It was beautiful. It also was heavy and difficult to store. There are people here that have metal ferris wheels, or gemmy, or whatever else. There is nothing wrong with those. Please don't assume I'm putting those down. Maybe one of those fit's your need/desire. My case for a PVC ferris wheel is this: PVC is cheap. It's lightweight and can be broken down or carried as a whole pretty easily. It is pretty weather resistant for 5 weeks out of the year, especially if you paint it (white even) to protect it. PVC is very easy to work with and requires no special tools. For me, a ferris wheel should be an octagon and that shape is very easy to achieve. A ferris wheel, whatever style you choose, gives a wow factor like nothing else in a display can achieve (in my experience and opinion of course). I hope you are as excited about it as I am. If you don't see anything from me, assume that I'm busy with life but please know that the build and the how-to is coming, and by all means don't hesitate to drop me a line with a friendly reminder. Knowing that people are interested will encourage me to do it even more than I already am!
  25. 7 points
  26. 7 points
    We made 3 of these and finished them, finallt. Have a few more projects to finish and the installation begins on 10th of Nov. They are 26" round, from 5 ply plywood. Good ol rustoleum paint.
  27. 7 points
    Very sad news. I'm so glad I have my molds and will pamper them even more now that this has happened. You can look forward to the price of molds on ebay skyrocketing. Better get what you want from GFP and ebay, while you can still afford it. I wouldn't be surprised, if some China company buys the molds and then redesigns them to put crappy solar lights in them that only last for two hours and gives them that ugly bluish light look. My greatest fear is that the molds will be thrown away or sold to collectors that will never produce them again. I hate saying this, but I feel that we Christmas loving blow molders are a dying breed of people. It is true that there are some new lovers, but the truth is that a large majority of people in our country have been losing the Christmas spirit for many years. Just look at how many neighborhoods and homes are dark at Christmas across our land. Many cities and towns hardly put anything up. These things started a long time ago and just continues to get worse as the years roll on. Most Americans seemed happier and optimistic back in the 1950s, 60's , 70's, & 80's than today. I hope America finds its happiness again someday. No matter what happens, I'll keep putting my stuff up and hope the younger people will see what Christmas was once like in America. I need to just shut up, because talking about this brings me down. To all my fellow Christmas blow molders, I say keep the joy alive in your hearts and on your lawns and never let it die. Now I need to go look at my molds to lift my spirits back up again.
  28. 7 points
    I have been taking a few pictures for blow molded.com recently, here is the TPI Santa Sled & reindeer (black nose version reindeer). The set with the black nose and this version of stand for the reindeer was made during the years 1997-2004. The set has the red reins for it, I just did not put them on for the picture since the pictures will be uploaded to the website separately. Mel
  29. 7 points
    My third completed project is the North Pole Lights, with 12v LEDs following the cane stripes and a 2W G4 LED to light the Polycarbonate globe.Based on what I'd learned in my 2 previous projects, together with a few online resources and available raw materials, this was a bit more of a challenge. The concrete bases for the North Poles were identical to the bases of my first Candy Cane project, the only difference being that a 75mm 3" SV BSP Female Adapter (Weld Fit type) was used instead of the 50mm type.I'm planning that these 3 lights will lead from my entrance gate to the front door - I may have to make a few more, but will see what the spacing is like when I set it all up in November.For this project I used 75mm white PVC pipe and relevant BSP PVC fittings, and the same concrete base process as my first project. The 12v LED strips were sourced from a local online store and will be powered by a dedicated 12v 10A power supply, which will also supply some other 12v projects being done.The supply list for these North Pole Lights was as follows: 3m of 75mm PVC plumbing pipe (for the pole sections - mine were each 900mm in length; how can have any length you choose though) 3x 75mm PVC Single Socket fittings (solvent weld fit on one end and rubber ring push fit on the other - see pics) 3x 6" polycarbonate globe fittings (you can also use the 8" fittings if you want a larger globe on the pole top) 3x light fittings that will fit the rubber ring push-fit end of the PVC single socket fitting (3" inset LED lights and some garden-spike lights could also fit) 3x 75mm 3" SV BSP Female Adapter Weld Fit type - for the concrete base stands section Jigsaw/hacksaw to cut the PVC pipe Sandpaper - 300 grit/fine Rustoleum Red, White and Clear spray paint for plastic (the kind that doesn't need plastic primer) Blue painter's tape (not masking tape as it's not flexible enough) Clear silicone sealant The supply list for the concrete base is identical to my smaller candy cane bases, as follows: 3x suitable shaped plastic bowls for the mold - I used a cheap clear plastic 2.5 liter bowls (base diameter of about 22cm's) that had a nice double outer ridge pattern - you can use any type/pattern though Concrete mix with 6mm-9mm stone - I used 6mm and found it ideal Styrofoam for the stand inner (temporary) Silicone to hold the PVC stand piece to the bowl mold (any tubed silicone will do, colour does not matter) 4mm-6mm wire for the concrete reinforcement ring an offcut length of thinnish wooden dowel (6mm-8mm), for tamping the concrete in the mold to get a smooth finish all round - although you could use a pencil, chopstick, etc Concrete/cement primer Polyurethane paint (water based is easier) for the finish Paint brush(es) 4x round rubber stick-on feet for the bottom of the base - I used ones that are 3cm diameter and 5mm thick The concrete base - I suggest starting with the bases first, as they have to dry for 2-3 days then cure for 20-odd days before you can prime/paint/finish them. Prepare your molds by washing with warm soapy water - add a little dish-washing liquid to warm water and wash the inside of the bowl thoroughly - dry with a micro-fibre cloth and place on a good flat surface. Using the non-threaded side of the 75mm 3" SV BSP Female Adapter as a guide, cut 3 "plugs" from a styrofoam block, so that they fit very snuggly into each of the smooth ends of the 75mm adapters. Make sure there is no styrofoam protruding beyond the top plastic section of the adapter - this side will be glued with the silicone to the bowl molds, leaving a clear/clean 75mm socket section once removed from the concrete mold - the pole section will then slide into this later when assembling. Next find the absolute center of the bowl mold and using the silicone, glue the styrofoam-plugged end of the adapter to the bottom of the bowl - use a good blob of silicone in the center of the styrofoam, which seems enough to stick it properly when pressed down. As the bowl is effectively an inverted mold, once the concrete is poured, set, removed from the mold and inverted, the adapter section will be encased in concrete; once when removed from the bowl the styrofoam plug can then be easily removed, leaving a nice clean 75mm pipe slot fitting to hold the main candy cane pole. You will have to repeat this 3 times for the 3 poles. Leave the silicone to dry overnight, so the adapter/styrofoam is stuck properly to the bowl. (the silicone/styrofoam will easily be removed later) While waiting for the silicone to dry, you can make up the 3 concrete reinforcement rings (1 for each base) using the 4/6mm wire; Cut enough wire so that you can make a circle from the wire length that will sit equidistant from the middle PVC adapter and the sides of the bowl - this will assist with strengthening the concrete base - I made 180 degree loops at each end and coupled them together - think of locking your 2 forefingers together in a link fashion You're now ready to mix and pour the concrete mix - I won't go into the mix ratios, etc - there are plenty of guides out there on the web - I used a higher-strength mix just to be safe. Alternatively use Quick Crete or similar if available in your country. I suggest preparing enough concrete mix to complete the 3 molds you need to fill (personal choice); you can however mix up each separately if you wish. With each of the plastic bowl molds on a sturdy flat/level surface, start pouring the concrete carefully into the mold, until the bowl is approx. half full form the top - this is where you will add the reinforcement wire ring - I suggest tamping out all of the air-pockets at this stage, add the wire ring then continue adding the concrete until it reaches the top of the bowl lip. Again carefully tamp out as much air as possible; TIP: one reason I bought the clear plastic bowl mold was so that I could see if there were any air bubbles left on the bowl sides - use the dowel stick or pencil to tamp out all these air bubbles - the smoother the finish of the concrete against the plastic the easier it is to finish it off later! Cover the filled molds with plastic sheet to minimise quick evaporation, and leave for 2-3 days - I misted the molds with a bottle water spray every 6-12 hours or so to ensure the concrete set correctly. After 2-3 days you should be able to remove the set concrete from the molds - I suggest using a scrap piece of plywood/MDF to make this process easier - place the board over the top of the bowl and hold tightly together, then flip the bowl over and the concrete based should literally drop out onto the board - Important: try not to touch the edges of the concrete base at this stage as they may crumble/crack - if you need to handle/move the freshly formed base, use your fingers/hands with the smooth top section of the concrete - I placed my bases on an upturned bowl to allow full curing for 20-odd days. Once cured (completely dry), carefully drill a 8mm-10mm hole through the center of the base - this let's out any water that may get in whilst in use...and is also used to route the wiring. It's now time to smooth the edges off around the bottom base, prime and paint - always follow the paint manufacturer's instructions for drying times, re-coat times, etc. I did 2 coats of primer and 4 coats of red polyurethane paint for the final finish. Once the paint has properly dried, 2-3 days, finish off the concrete base stands by placing the 4 or more round rubber stick-on feet underneath the base at quarter intervals - these also make it easier to lift the base when moving it around and prevent chipping of the base bottom/sides! And now the North Poles: Cut the 75mm PVC pipe into 3x 900mm lengths (you can use any length you wish though) Lightly sand the outer PVC pipe sections to remove burrs, bumps and the like. Wash all sections with soapy warm water to remove the dirt. Dry with a micro-fiber cloth and let dry out thoroughly before painting. TIP: use latex gloves from this point onward to keep the white PVC clean. Dry fit the Single Socket to the pipe lengths to ensure they fit and are tight - there is no need to glue these together as the tight fit will not allow water to penetrate. Once you're happy with the dry fitting, remove the Single Socket fittings - it's time to mark the candy stripes with the painter's tape - I used a 45 degree angle for the pole stripes. Also tape off the main pole end, approx, 1" - this will allow the PVC pipe to slide into the concrete base section with ease; if you paint this section it will probably not fit properly and you'll end up having to sand it back... Once wrapped, spray the red paint, thin coats, 2-3 re-coats depending on your spray paint coverage; remove the painter's tape about 10-15 minutes after the final spray coat. Once the red is thoroughly dry, mask off the red painted section with painter's tape, then spray the the white using 2-3 thin coats; remove the painter's tape about 10-15 minutes after the final spray coat. You can skip this step if you're happy with the raw matt white PVC plastic finish - I wanted a glossy finish, so decided to paint the white too! Some people spray the whole cane white, then do the red - although my process is more finicky and time-consuming, it uses less paint and the final finish is great. Once the white is thoroughly dry, spray with the final clear coat - 1-2 thin coats. Allow to dry for 2-3 days. To make the top light fittings: Carefully remove the rubber ring end cover - this should pop-off rather easily - remove the rubber ring; this will be used later when re-fitting. Spray paint the main body of the Single Socket either red or white and let it dry thoroughly - I did mine red TIP: mask off the section that the push-on cover goes onto - makes it easier to pop-on and pop-off. I spay painted the pop-off cover white to match the polycarbonate globe fitting - these will be joined together eventually. Also let it dry thoroughly. The polycarbonate globe fittings had scew-on threads, which I needed to remove - this was done with a Dremel cutter - see pictures - I sanded smooth the base to ensure it would fit to the pop-off white cover. Using a decent glue suitable for plastic/poly, glue the pop-off white cover to the polycarbonate fitting - see pictures. Let dry. I had a new unused set of 5 halogen 12v garden spike lights that I found in the garage, and decided to use these for the pole lights - the body of the spike lights fitted perfectly into the 75mm Single Socket end, where the pop-off white cover, rubber ring and poly globe could be pushed together to create a water tight seal - it's also easy to pop-off the cover to change the bulb when needed - the beauty of the garden lights was that they also come with color filters, so I can add those easily if I want different colour top lights at any stage. The halogen globes were changed to White G4 2W 12v LEDs. The feeder wire from the light fitting was long enough to reach the base of the main pole, so hooking up the power was also easy. Push the top light section, main pole and base together and test that the light works properly. Now all you need to do is hook up the wiring to the power source when setting up - I'll be stringing these in parallel along my pathway. To fit the LED red/white stripes I used lengths of self-stick red and white weatherproof LED strips, powered by 12v (purchased a separate 12v 10A transformer as it will power some other of my decorations ) It's as simple as measuring the length of LED strip you need and cut to length - use a piece of spare nylon line to get the wrapped length accurate. TIP: remember to check your specific LED strip to see where the standard cut marks are. Starting from the top of the pole just under the start of the top socket line, stick the non-connection end of the LED strip and continue sticking the strips around the center of each coloured paint stripe on the pole, ending about 1" from the bottom of the pole. Do this carefully as the self-stick can pull the spray paint off if you're not careful. I drilled 2 holes approx. the width of the LED strip (4mm), about 1" from the bottom mark after the pole is slotted into the concrete base, in the center of each of the red and white coloured stripes. Feed the connecting ends of the LED strip through the drilled holes and connect together. Depending how you connect your LED's will depend on how you route the power - I'll be running the 12v power into the base of the pole and connect up using push connectors - this makes it much easy to connect, remove and store. Here's some pictures of the process, with the final LED strips being fitted: If you need more pictures or information on the steps let me know.You can make these as big/small/short/tall as you want - I've seen some with larger top lights and wider diameter PVC - the trick is finding a suitable light fitting!My next thread will my scratch-built collapsible 8' Solar LED Medi-Tree with Portable Hole...
  30. 7 points
    Even though it still had a bit of color left on it, when lighted it looked somewhat terrible from the fading, though I forgot to take photos while lighted. I also accidentally got a small amount over overspray on the feet once; I need to take a quick moment to lightly sand it off. It took a few days to do but only because of my time limitations. There's about twelve hours I put into it I believe. I'd love to make the candycane a two-tone color, the hands into blue mittens and the top-hat ribbon green, but that will remain just a thought. One photo is out of place. My paint stages were- yellow, red, green, black. I meant to do the black first. I wasn't really sure if I should do the smaller or largest portions first, but it seemed to work out. I also wanted to do the cheeks a bit lighter.
  31. 7 points
    Got all of the ones lit up now the old wireing was really scary ha a lot of broken bulbs and wires later I finally have these running again to there full beauty and only The 9 bell one I added the candle and the berry things to just to make it unique in no way or form is it originally like that , next year I'll be adding led colored bulbs so don't hate on them now I have more plans just trying to display them so I don't really kind if they are one color thanks
  32. 7 points
    42 Blow Molds, over a dozen wire frames, 9,000 lights or so, all static.
  33. 7 points
    Seemed like a good idea but needs some improvement, any ideas?
  34. 7 points
    The sled need to be hung and my parents predered our new rails so I have to wait to decorate them but I have about 30 little ones for across the entire bottom and I may get a few projectors, hope you enjoy
  35. 7 points
    I bought all these blow molds for $15cdn each. 44 in total. I know some of them are not worth $15 but it was a bulk buy. What does everyone think?
  36. 7 points
  37. 7 points
    Scored these from a few antique stores. The two bigger santas were only $6 each!!
  38. 7 points
    My finds of the day got all of it for 7 bucks ,yay
  39. 7 points
    Found these yesterday from the nicest person I've ever met
  40. 7 points
    Howdy folks! This is our display for this year! A bunch of new molds and the new reindeer stand that me and my brother built! Had wonderful turnout this year! No failures until after Christmas. Had part of a string on white C6 LEDs go out . Great year!
  41. 7 points
    I displayed then like this. See on top of roof
  42. 6 points
    Friday night, from a facebook message, "You should serve cookies and hot chocolate during your show. Well, if not cookies, just hot chocolate," (I just spent three weeks putting up the lights!! Not even a thanks for the light show. Cookies my...!
  43. 6 points
    Now to get the goofy taz and tweedy bird and the blue coat clown , the pooh and the snoopy both have cracks but I can fix them
  44. 6 points
    My second completed project was a giant PVC Candy Cane, with 12v LEDs following the cane stripes.Given what I learned in my first project, I simply scaled up and added some waterproof 12v LED strips - this decoration will stand just inside our front entrance gate to the property.For this project I used 75mm white PVC pipe and relevant BSP PVC fittings, which were fairly readily available when I'm located, and the larger concrete base is a scaled up version of my smaller Candy Cane concrete bases also from my first project. The 12v LED strips were sourced from a local online store and will be powered by a dedicated 12v 10A power supply (which will also supply some other 12v projects being done ).The supply list for this Giant Candy Cane was as follows: 1.5m of 75mm PVC plumbing pipe (my main cane tube length was 130cm, with some extra allowed for the joiners and final cane end) 3x 75mm 45/135 degree SW BSP bend angles - must be the weld fit, not push fit type - see pics 1x 75mm 45/135 degree SW BSP double joiner - must be the weld fit, not push fit type - see pics 1x 75mm endcap - must be the weld fit, not push fit type 1x 75mm 3" SV BSP Female Adapter Weld Fit type - for the concrete base stand section PVC glue/weld Jigsaw/hacksaw to cut the PVC pipe Sandpaper - 300 grit/fine Rustoleum Red, White and Clear spray paint for plastic (the kind that doesn't need plastic primer) Blue painter's tape (not masking tape as it's not flexible enough) The supply list for the concrete base is almost identical to the smaller candy cane bases, as follows: Suitable larger shaped plastic bowl for the mold - I used a cheap clear plastic 10 liter bowl (base diameter of about 34cm's) that had a nice double outer ridge pattern - you can use any type/pattern though Concrete mix with 6mm-9mm stone - I used 6mm and found it ideal (no Quick Crete in SA unfortunately...) Styrofoam for the stand inner (temporary) Silicone to hold the PVC stand piece to the bowl mold (any tubed silicone will do, colour does not matter) 4mm-6mm wire for the 2 concrete reinforcement ring(s) an offcut length of thinnish wooden dowel (6mm-8mm), for tamping the concrete in the mold to get a smooth finish all round - although you could use a pencil, chopstick, etc Concrete/cement primer Polyurethane paint (water based is easier) for the finish Paint brush(es) 8x or 12x round rubber stick-on feet for the bottom of the base - I used 8x of the ones that are 40mm diameter and 10mm thick The concrete base - I suggest starting with the base first, as it has to dry for 2-3 days then cure for 28-odd days before you can prime/paint/finish it. Prepare your mold by washing with warm soapy water - add a little dish-washing liquid to warm water and wash the inside of the bowl thoroughly - dry with a micro-fibre cloth and place on a good flat surface. Using the non-threaded side of the 75mm 3" SV BSP Female Adapter as a guide, cut a "plug" from the styrofoam block, so that it fits very snuggly into the smooth end of the 75mm adapter. Make sure there is no styrofoam protruding beyond the top plastic section of the adapter - this side will be glued with the silicone to the bowl mold, leaving a clear/clean 75mm socket section once removed from the concrete mold. Next find the absolute center of the bowl mold and using the silicone, glue the styrofoam-plugged end of the adapter to the bottom of the bowl - use a good blob of silicone in the center of the styrofoam, which seems enough to stick it properly when pressed down. As the bowl is effectively an inverted mold, once the concrete is poured, set, removed from the mold and inverted, the adapter section will be encased in concrete; once when removed from the bowl the styrofoam plug can then be easily removed, leaving a nice clean 75mm pipe slot fitting to hold the main candy cane pole. Leave the silicone/caulking to dry overnight, so the adapter/styrofoam is stuck properly to the bowl. (the silicone/styrofoam will easily be removed later) While waiting for the silicone to dry, you can make up the 2 concrete reinforcement rings using the 4/6mm wire; one will have a larger diamter than the other based on your bowl mold size. Cut enough wire so that you can make 2 circles from the wire lengths that will sit equidistant from the middle PVC adapter and the sides of the bowl - one will be approx. 2" from the bottom of the mold and the other about 2 from the top of the mold - these will assist with strengthening the concrete base as it's rather heavy when cured/finished - I made 180 degree loops at each end of the wire ring and coupled them together - think of locking your 2 forefingers together in a link fashion You're now ready to mix and pour the concrete mix - I won't go into the mix ratios, etc - there are plenty of guides out there on the web - I used a higher-strength mix just to be safe. Alternatively use Quick Crete or similar if available in your country. With the plastic bowl mold on a flat/level surface, start pouring the concrete carefully, until the bowl is approx. 2" full - this is where you will add the first smaller reinforcement wire ring - I suggest tamping out some of the air-pockets at this stage, then continue adding the concrete until it reaches approx. 2" from the top of the bowl lip - now add the second larger reinforcement wire ring. Again carefully tamp out as much air as possible, then fill the mold to the top; one reason I bought the clear plastic bowl mold was so that I could see if there were any air bubbles left on the bowl sides - use the dowel stick or pencil to tamp out all these air bubbles - the smoother the finish of the concrete the easier it is to finish it off later! Cover the bowl with plastic sheet to minimise quick evaporation, and leave for 2-3 days - I misted the mold with a bottle water spray every 6-12 hours or so to ensure the concrete set correctly. After 3 days you should be able to remove the set concrete from the bowl mold - I suggest using a scrap piece of plywood/MDF to make this easier - place the board over the top of the bowl and hold tightly together, then flip the bowl over and the concrete based should literally drop out onto the board - Important: try not to touch the edges of the concrete base at this stage as they may crumble/crack - if you need to handle/move the freshly formed base, use your fingers/hands with the smooth top section of the concrete - I placed my bases on an upturned bowl to allow full curing for 28-odd days. Once cured (completely dry), drill a hole through the center of the base - this let's out any water that may get in whilst in use... It's now time to smooth the edges off around the bottom base, prime and paint - always follow the paint manufacturer's instructions for drying times, re-coat times, etc. I did 2 coats of primer and 4 coats of red polyurethane paint for the final finish. Once the paint has properly dried, 2-3 days, finish off the concrete base stands by placing the 8 or more round rubber stick-on feet underneath the base at quarter intervals - these also make it easier to lift the base when moving it around! Here's some pictures of the larger concrete base in progress:And now the Giant Candy Cane: Cut the 75mm PVC pipe into the following lengths: 1x 1300mm (main pipe), 1x 160mm (end pipe drop), 1x 40mm (to join the last 45 degree angle piece) Lightly sand all outer PVC sections to remove burrs, bumps and the like. Wash all sections with cleaner and warm water to remove the dirt. Dry with a micro-fiber cloth and let dry out thoroughly before gluing/painting. Tip: use latex gloves from this point onward to keep the white PVC clean. Dry fit each section using the above cut lengths, adding an end cap to the last pipe section - the cane should have: 1300mm main pipe, 45 angle, 45 angle, 45 angle, 40mm pipe joiner, 160mm pipe, end cap. Once you're happy with the dry fitting, you can now glue the sections together section by section - Tip: do this on a large enough flat surface/table to allow the pipes and joiners to stay level and flat until the glue has set. Remember that the PVC glue dries quickly, so you have minimal time to adjust the sections before they set solid. Once the glue has set, it's time to mark the candy stripes - I used a 45 degree angle for the main pole stripe, following the contour shape of the "cane strip" around the bent cane section - on this larger cane I found that the curve was large enough to "wrap" it with the painter's tape. Also tape off the main pole end, approx, 5-7cm - this will allow the PVC pipe to slide into the concrete base section with ease; if you paint this section it will probably not fit properly and you'll end up having to sand it back... Once wrapped, spray the red paint, thin coats, 2-3 re-coats depending on your spray paint coverage; remove the painter's tape about 10-15 minutes after the final spray coat. Once the red is thoroughly dry, mask off the red painted section with painter's tape, then spray the the white using 2-3 thin coats; remove the painter's tape about 10-15 minutes after the final spray coat. You can skip this step if you're happy with the raw matt white PVC plastic finish - I wanted a glossy finish, so decided to paint the white too! Some people spray the whole cane white, then do the red - although my process is more finicky and time-consuming, it uses less paint and the final finish is great. Once the white is thoroughly dry, spray with the final clear coat - 1-2 thin coats. Allow to dry for 2-3 days Slot the completed unlit Candy Cane section into the concrete base section to check the correct fit - job done, now to fit the LED lighting strips! I used lengths of self-stick red and white weatherproof LED strips, powered by 12v (purchased a separate 12v 10A transformer as it will power some other of my decorations ) It's as simple as measuring the length of LED strip you need and cut to length - use a piece of spare wire of nylon line to get the wrapped length. Tip: remember to check your specific LED strip to see where the standard cut marks are. Starting from the short bend section, stick the non-connection end of the LED strip and sticking the strips around the center of each coloured paint stripe on the cane, ending at the bottom of the main pole end. Do this carefully as the self-stick can pull the spray paint off if you're not careful. I drilled 2 holes approx. the width of the LED strip (4mm), about 1" from the bottom mark after the cane is slotted into the concrete base, in the center of the red and white coloured stripe. Feed the connecting ends of the LED strip through the drilled holes and connect together Depending how you connect your LED's will depend on how you route the power - I'll be running the 12v power into the base of the cane pole, next to the one of the holes I drilled earlier and connecting with 2 suitable push-connectors - this makes it much easy to connect, remove and store. Here's some pictures of the giant candy cane process, prior to the final LED strips being fitted - I'll upload a "completed" photo soonest: Here's the final product with the stand - unlit and lit - I'm really happy with how this turned out! The outdoor-grade wiring runs through the drainage hole drilled in the base of the stand. I hope the above was fairly easy to follow - if you need more pictures let me know.You can also make an even bigger candy cane from 110mm PVC pipe, or bigger still with the 160mm pipe, although this gets really expensive where I'm from!My next thread will be on the 3x North Pole lights project for the paved entrance walkway...
  45. 6 points
    This is a new house where I wasnt able to utilize all my lights that I wanted to but I was able to finish off my grinch in time.
  46. 6 points
    How many are on here? I don't guage a display of how many lights are in it, only that it's done tastefully:) and from the heart:)
  47. 6 points
    Just got them out out. Santa needs to be repainted but im over the moon on the find! Anyone have any info on them? Would like to find one more to make a Rudolph. Got the 8 reindeer and santa for $150! I thought it was a steal?
  48. 6 points
    This tree is my most prized possession. I strung all 2000 lights myself and almost all ornaments are from family members that have moved on. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  49. 6 points
    Thank you to all that have served and to your families for a job well done through the years! John Lewis US Army, CPT(Retired)
  50. 6 points
    Here is a video of what I have done with that song:
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