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Chris in Ct

Roof top LED's buried in snow/solution???

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The LED's I put on the peak of my roof are buried in snow and have been since a week before Christmas and I think I wont see them again till Spring at this point.

I was thinking about what I could possibly do for next year to keep the lights from getting buried.

I was thinking how the old C-9's would melt themselves out in no time at all due to the heat they put off.

That got me thinking what if I attached my LED's to rope light it would serve a couple purposes.

I could attach the LED strings to the rope light which will allow all the LED lights to stand straight up rather than lying down like they do and also give them an extra inch in height off the roof.

When the LED's become buried in snow I could turn on the rope light which should melt the snow covering the LED's.

I suppose you could use the rope light as part of your display if you wanted to, but if you didn't you shouldn't be able to see it when left off.

What do you think?

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The thought of moving to Florida crossed my mind today. I'm sorry this won't help you now. :D

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You didn't mention how deep the snow is. But have you seen those I believe metal brackets that are bent at a 90 degrees. And the foot has a "V" cut to slid under the shingles and fork around the nail hold down the above shingle. Then there are some holes in the upright part of the bracket to hold a light/LED. This will hold your lights up and off of the shingles. I think I saw them on one of the vendors that advertise here on PC.

Max

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You didn't mention how deep the snow is. But have you seen those I believe metal brackets that are bent at a 90 degrees. And the foot has a "V" cut to slid under the shingles and fork around the nail hold down the above shingle. Then there are some holes in the upright part of the bracket to hold a light/LED. This will hold your lights up and off of the shingles. I think I saw them on one of the vendors that advertise here on PC.

Max

I have never seen them. Right now I have about 10" of snow on the roof.

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Just found another thing to add to my list of reasons I love living in Florida... ;)

1. putting Christmas lights up in 75 degree weather and getting tan

2. taking down Christmas lights in 65-70 degree weather

3. not having to dig them out from 10" of snow... :D

Surely the snow must melt some time, right? I mean, I'm from Ohio originally and although it snows a bunch up there, there are times when it warms up a little and the snow melts. I suppose in the mountains that might not happen.

Good luck with your adventure.

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Try this:

http://plumbing.hardwarestore.com/52-299-heat-tape/easyheat-electric-pipe-heating-cable-291716.aspx

I personally have never tried it, but I assume it would work...

Tyler

Why? rope light would work just as well and cost nothing close to what that would cost.

Besides rope light lights up,might look good to boot

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Would it be possible to attach the LED lights to a run of copper plumbing pipe, the pipe being fixed to the roof.

Connect a length of garden hose to one end of the pipe, leaving the other end open.

When the lights become buried in snow, run hot water through the pipe in order to melt the snow.

Hot water does of course cost money, but a few minutes running should melt the snow without exxcessive cost.

Alternativly thread through the pipe, anti-frost heating tape, as sold in plumbing supply places, this would look neater than trying to attach the lights direct to heating tape. Be certain to electricly ground the pipe.

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hmmm and i complained about not getting any snow for Christmas lol

You pay shipping and I'll send you some. :D

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Hair dryer taped to a pole? Or run a set of c9's above the leds if on a slope and only plug them in when you need de-icing?

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Would it be possible to attach the LED lights to a run of copper plumbing pipe, the pipe being fixed to the roof.

Connect a length of garden hose to one end of the pipe, leaving the other end open.

When the lights become buried in snow, run hot water through the pipe in order to melt the snow.

Hot water does of course cost money, but a few minutes running should melt the snow without exxcessive cost.

Alternativly thread through the pipe, anti-frost heating tape, as sold in plumbing supply places, this would look neater than trying to attach the lights direct to heating tape. Be certain to electricly ground the pipe.

Exspensive and not practical. You would have to drain the system every time you wern't using it or the pipes would freeze then burst.

The rope light idea was something for others to consider.I have read others complain that their roof top LED's were buried and useless for display purposes. This is an easy fix that I know will work,it's inexspensive and might add an added element to a display as a bonus.

Not to mention it will allow your lights to stand up without using a clip for each bulb.

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Have you tried laying your rope light out in the snow to test it? My rope light doesn't get very warm but it is some higher effeciency type using about 1/2 as much wattage as normal but full brightness. It is incandesant and not led ropelight. If it passes the test go for it next year.

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This is one reason that keeps me from buying LED's. The ONLY thing that saved my mega tree from the ice storm we had was that the heat from the mini's kept the ice to a minimum.

The lights on my upper peak are waiting for warm weather to arrive otherwise they stay put.

The rope light might just do the trick for you. If you go this route I would turn them on as soon as the snow starts coming down to try to stay ahead of it.

Scott

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I saw a unit at Lowe's that is primarily used along the edge of your roof but I don't see why you couldn't run one strip down each side of your roof's hip line. The unit is a metal wire system attahced to a plastic frame in the shape of an arrowhead. The units attache together like a string of lights, in fact, I don't see why the unit couldn't just plug right into your light circuit. The current runs through the wire and heats up the wire thus melting the snow. Never tried them, but I know that they have them. You might give a looksee and try it.:D

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You could try using some of that wiring used for preventing ice dams

http://www.delta-therm.com/roof_deicing_cables.htm

But this may cause other problems. If the wire is too close to the LED wire, it could create too much heat and damage the LEDs (or worse, start a fire). Also, with anything to melt the snow, it may cause water to get trapped around the LEDs and cause even more damage.

But in any case, DO NOT try to go up there and clear the snow from around the lights. It's too dangerous and the lights just aren't worth it.

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If I get them down for you tomorrow do I get the lights for free? ;) (sorry, couldn't resist Chris!)

-Jeff

p.s. We are in the same boat, I'm just going to wait until everything melts. You can't see the lights under the snow so it's not an eyesore.

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I think the rope light is the best idea posted here, but then again, I know nothing.

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The thing is...since lights look better when covered in snow :) why would you want

to melt that snow :) LOL

Because LED's do not show under 10" of snow.

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The thing is...since lights look better when covered in snow why would you want

to melt that snow LOL

Because LED's do not show under 10" of snow.

Didn't really think about that since mini's will show under up to about 18" (or more if its dark)

... LEDs have always looked brighter to me (but i have also never put a set where it would

get covered in snow LOL)

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Didn't really think about that since mini's will show under up to about 18" (or more if its dark)

I think it depends on the snow. I have some Malibu lights buried in less snow than that, but it's compacted since much of it was blown off the driveway-- and you can't even tell the lights are on...

I've never considered putting lights on the roof/ground practical here in MN -- too great of a chance they'll get buried. And that's with regular mini's...

-Tim

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